Construction sites are always dangerous places, even for workers, due to the many different hazardous factors present and used or operated within their vicinities. These include dangerous and flammable substances, sharp and heavy tools, heavy machinery, dangerous fumes and dust, and exposed electrical wiring; one may also include the high places where construction workers need to do their assigned work.

State and federal government entities are fully aware of the various dangers construction workers (as well as many other workers) are exposed to. Thus, due to workplace dangers, the Occupational Safety and Health Act was passed into law in 1970; this Act, in turn, gave birth to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1971, a federal agency tasked to enforce safety and health standard laws in all workplaces.

Since the OSHA came into existence in 1971, it has made an impact in the industrial field, reducing the number of workplace injuries by 67% and deaths by 65%. Thus, while the 1970s registered as many as 38 worker deaths per day, the strict implementation of OSHA rules, especially during the last few years, has resulted to about only 12 fatal accidents in construction sites beginning in 2012. Still a loss of many lives, but definitely so much lower compared with the past decades.

Some of the safety standards that OSHA enforces, in construction sites particularly, are proper lighting all throughout the construction area, adequate worker protection against falls and falling objects, wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE), safe and sturdy stairways and ladders, use of reliable and properly assembled scaffoldings, 2A rating fire extinguishers every 3000 square feet, body-flushing and eye-washing facilities within 25 feet of battery-changing areas, properly displayed and clearly visible accident-prevention signs, which ought to be removed when hazard no longer exists in the area, and ground fault-circuit interrupters (GFCIs).

Accidents that construction workers may sustain during the performance of their work, especially those resulting from their co-workers’, supervisor’s or employer’s direct violation of the safety and health standard laws, may be considered personal injuries, injuries that are product of someone else’s negligence or carelessness. Though injured workers (or those who develop work-related illnesses due to exposure to hazardous substances, even if the illness becomes apparent months or years after the worker has already resigned or retired from work) may apply for the Workers’ Compensation Insurance benefit, they also have the right to file a claims lawsuit against their employer. One of the conditions stipulated in the Workers’ Comp is freedom of the employer from further legal responsibility once the injured worker avails of the benefit. On this regard, it is highly advisable that a worker who gets hurt in an accident seek the help of a lawyer, who has full knowledge of, and experience in, personal injury laws and lawsuits, respectively, and who can advise him/her about the legal rights he/she has regarding lawsuits and compensation for whatever damages the injury or illness would result to.


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“Hot work” is the term used to refer to people whose jobs regularly expose them to heat and danger. These individuals include those who work in construction sites, railroads, mines, chemical plants, liquefied petroleum exchange plants, restaurants, hotels, and so forth.

To these workers, especially those whose work take them to gas or propane exchange plants, the possibility of an explosion accident is one big risk that they face every day. 2010 records released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show 187 lives lost due to a fire and an explosion in a propane plant. In July of 2013, another propane explosion, which injured eight workers, wreaked great damage in a refilling plant and which required residents within a half-mile from the explosion site to evacuate, occurred somewhere in Florida.

Though a highly combustible and dangerous gas, propane, which can be made into liquefied petroleum gas, is a very common fuel used in American homes and commercial buildings. People use it to cook food, barbecue, heat their homes and fuel engines. To avoid possible occurrences of propane explosion, propane systems and propane-powered appliances should be checked by qualified service technicians regularly. Home owners and residents should also avoid using propane grills inside their homes or in small and enclosed areas; they also should never use damaged propane cylinders or tanks.

It only requires a small amount of propane for an explosion to occur. Thus, if there is any hint or suspicion of propane leak, you should never switch on or use any device or appliance which causes a spark.

Besides home use, the Milwaukee personal injury attorneys of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C. ® mention the use of this gas in a wide variety of industries, from glass companies to brick kilns to agricultural centers. In these environments, propane is often stored in larger containers, making the potential for a large explosion even greater. If a propane tank isn’t properly cared for, a leak could develop that the smallest spark could set off.

An explosion, especially if this occurs in a workplace, can result to innocent workers getting injured and being made to suffer extremely painful injuries that can alter their condition and activities for the rest of their lives. Though the results of an explosion accident may be irreversible, it will somehow be a relief for the injured worker to know that he/she will be paid the full amount of compensation that will allow him/her get the medical treatment needed and which will help see to his/her family’s daily needs.


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Where there are motorized vehicles, then one thing is most likely to happen: accident.

Way back in the early 1900s, people already saw that cars were bound to crash; this is why carrying auto insurance was made a mandate. Motorcycle, car and truck accidents are not the only causes of accidents, however, ships and boats, have, for so long, even longer than any motor vehicle on land, been causes of injuries and death to so many men, even during ancient times.

Today, the U.S. Coast Guard, as one of its many functions, makes a compilation of all reported recreational boating accidents in the U.S. In 2015, for instance, it counted 4,158 accidents that resulted to 626 deaths and 2,613 injuries. This 626 deaths is much higher than the 2013 and 2014 records, which were at 560 and 610, respectively.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the top five leading contributing factors to accidents are operator inexperience, operator inattention, improper lookout, excessive speed and alcohol. Operator inexperience, specifically, has been the leading cause of boating accidents all across the U.S. for almost two decades now. Boating is a totally fun and adventure-filled activity; however,operating a boat without having proper knowledge about its safe operation and proper attitude while on water can be dangerous even to experienced operators.

Boat operators have a lot to learn, including boating laws and regulations, rules on navigation, what to do in a weather-related emergencies, and knot tying among others. The U.S. Coast Guard advises operators to take a boating education class where they will learn all the basics, and the dos and don’ts of boating. While taking this education class is not really required for operating a watercraft in some states, having the knowledge on how to have a safe and enjoyable time on the water may reduce the likelihood of getting into an accident.

The Clawson & Staubes law firm mentions and explains in its website some of the laws boat operators will need to observe while on waters. It also explains what legal action a person can pursue in the event an accident does occur due to the carelessness or negligence of someone else.


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Hospice is not a situation anyone wants to find themselves in. This form of senior care is usually reserved for those with chronic illness and is intended to soothe the patient as they enter the final stages of their life. Assuring the patient is comfortable is the number one goal of hospice care.

When a patient enters hospice care, they usually only have six months to a year to live. Common chronic illnesses that place a patient in hospice care include cancer, dementia, heart disease, lung disease, and more. This a difficult time of transition the patient enters the final stages of their life. Hospice seeks to ease this stress and allows you to focus on spending time with your loved one. Allow hospice care to not only bring comfort to loved one, but you as well.

If the patient has uncontrolled and sudden symptoms, inpatient care can assure that a trained hospice staff is constantly with them. This gives you the peace of mind that if a medical emergency were to occur, your loved one would be in good hands. If your loved one prefers to stay in their home and they have symptoms controlled by medication, routine home care could prove to be a good option as it promotes the feeling of normalcy.

Hospice allows for a family to focus on creating positive final memories with their loved one instead of having to focus solely on giving them the medical attention the need in their final stage of life. This allows for easier days for the whole family. Hospice care provides an unmatched sense of peace at a time when things are usually uncertain and scary.

According to SeniorAdvice.com, “between 1.5 million and 1.6 million individuals are currently receiving some form of hospice treatment,” showing the importance of understanding and being aware of this form of care as an option for your loved one when everything else seems uncertain.


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If there is one type of vehicle which can be the most dangerous to drive, that could be motorcycles. According to the website of Houston personal injury lawyers, bicycle accidents account for many road-related injuries and deaths in the country. In fact, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration even revealed that when you are riding a motorcycle, you are 35 times more prone to fatal accidents than those riding in cars.

To protect yourself from debilitating and fatal injuries brought about by a motorcycle-related accident, always keep in mind these simple tips:

Check before you go

Just like any other vehicles, you should check the condition of your motorcycle before hitting the road. You can do a front-to-end inspection of your bike, starting from the headlight to its brake light.

Invest in good bicycle components

You may consider investing in anti-lock braking system (ABS), which works pretty much the same as that of cars. ABS prevents your wheels from locking up during a hard brake, preventing you from skidding and losing control of your bike. Good tires and quality head and tail lights are also needed for a safe ride.

Protect your head, always

Buying a good helmet is one thing; wearing it is another. You might be tempted not to wear a helmet, especially when you are just driving three to four blocks to get your groceries. However, because accidents are never expected, you should be on guard at all times.

Remember that you are a vehicle

Your motorcycle is a motorized vehicle, which means you should adapt a driver common sense and act in accordance with the traffic rules and regulations. However, you should also remember that you are more vulnerable than four-wheeled cars around you, so you have to be extra cautious and more defensive when driving.

Learn more about driving

Joining in a motorcycle club near your area can help you learn more about motorcycle safety tips. Some organizations offer free riding course, which gives you an opportunity to further hone your skills.


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